History Bizarre

Strange, weird, wonderful history

Fantastically Wrong: Ridiculous Mythical Critters Dreamed Up by 19th Century Lumberjacks | Science | WIRED

“We might have loaded our Boats with young Boobies and Penguins in an Hour, and took as many as we thought convenient, before we return’d Aboard, which our Men eat. The Booby has already been describ’d…The Penguin is a Bird near as big as a Goose, having two Fins, instead of Wings, and Scales under the Belly, and on the Thighs, Duck-footed, cannot fly, but runs very fast, fluttering along with the Fins, lives on Fish, and eats fishy, the Flesh black, and looks like Bull Beef, yet we eat them, for Want of better Food.”

—   Edward Cooke, A Voyage to the South Sea, and Round the World, Perform’d in the Years 1708, 1709, 1710, and 1711. Containing A JOURNAL of all memorable Transactions during the said VOYAGE; the Winds, Currents, and Variation of the Compass; the taking of the Towns of Puna and Guayaquil, and several PRIZES, one of which a rich Acapulco Ship. A DESCRIPTION of the American Coasts, from Tierra del Fuego in the South, to California in the North, (from the Coasting-Pilot, a Spanish Manuscript.) An HISTORICAL ACCOUNT of all those Countries from the best AUTHORS. With a new MAP and DESCRIPTION of the mighty River of the AMAZONS. Wherein an ACCOUNT is given of Mr. Alexander Selkirk, his Manner of living and taming some wild Beasts during the four Years and four Months he liv’d upon the uninhabited Island of Juan Fernandes. Illustrated with Cuts and Maps, 2 vols.(London: Printed by H. M. for B. Lintot and R. Gosling in fleet-Street, A. Bettesworth on London-Bridge, and W. Innys in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, 1712), 127. (via raherrmann)

10 dangers of Georgian London - from smallpox to gin consumption | History Extra

What was life like on the streets of 18th-century London? As part of our new series of guest blogs, Lucy Inglis, historian and creator of the award-winning Georgian London blog, reveals 10 everyday hazards faced by Londoners in the 1700s – from disease and cesspits to gin consumption…

Fish Custard

Should women wear trousers?

Ten things you never knew about Ophelia - Telegraph

historybizarre:

catafalques:

English Hairwork Memorial Picture on Glass, late 18th/early 19th century, the glass panel mounted with hairwork scene of bird in flight above a tree and an urn, with giltwood arched top surround set into later paper mat and modern giltwood frame.

historybizarre:

catafalques:

English Hairwork Memorial Picture on Glass, late 18th/early 19th century, the glass panel mounted with hairwork scene of bird in flight above a tree and an urn, with giltwood arched top surround set into later paper mat and modern giltwood frame.

Love's Revenge: Letters of an 18th-Century Woman Novelist

Theatre of war: the drama of the Special Operations Executive

It’s a bit glib to say so, but in some ways the Special Operations Executive (SOE), Britain’s secret warfare organisation during the Second World War, resembled an amateur dramatics society (with added plastic explosive). I find SOE’s dependence on professional theatrical production techniques and personnel pretty striking. SOE developed characters and scripts, casting and acting coaching, costume and prop design, and its agents – its actors – put on the performance of their lives.

George Washington’s Top 10 Talents According to John Adams | Journal of the American Revolution