History Bizarre

Strange, weird, wonderful history

Two Nerdy History Girls: The Truth about the Big Hair of the 1770s: Part One

Negative myths about past-fashion like maggot-filled wigs and rib-breaking corsets are so easy to accept because they’re self-congratulatory. We’re so much wiser now in 2014, aren’t we? The truth about the elaborate hair styles of the 1770s is actually more interesting than the myths, and makes more sense, too.

scienceofsarcasm:

Evening Post: August 12, 1899.
"She immediately alighted, caught hold of the astonished youth, and gave him a sound thrashing, using her fists in a scientific fashion…”

I would love to know what this means.

(Source: paperspast.natlib.govt.nz)

The 10 Worst Typos In History

missedinhistory:

Sawbones is a show about medical history. It’s for fun. Sometimes it’s also for giving me ideas for podcast subjects, which is what happened with today’s episode. After listening to the Sawbones episode Corpse Theft and the Resurrection Men while on a plane, I decided we needed an entire episode just on the Doctors’ Riot of 1788. That’s when a giant mob of people got so angry that buried bodies were being dug up for dissection that they stormed two different sites of medical study in New York. This was just one of at least 17 so-called anatomy riots in the U.S. between 1765 and 1854.

Here’s a link to our notes and research. We also hook you up with two places to learn whether England and France were at war in a given year. Since these are also for fun, please no pedantry about whether “England” or “France” is really the right name.

How Shall We Decorate Our Study Parlors?

"So much has been lately said and written about artistic furniture and decoration, that it would seem as if almost every one must be aware of the importance of the subject. But many of our students seem hardly to realize that their study-parlors are the exponents of their own characters."
- Vassar College Miscellany News, 1 July 1877

History Field Trip: Morbid Anatomy Museum

The Morbid Anatomy Museum recently opened in Brooklyn, New York, USA.

The Morbid Anatomy Museum is a new 4,200 square foot non-profit institution dedicated to the celebration and exhibition of artifacts, histories and ideas which fall between the cracks of high and low culture, death and beauty, and disciplinary divides.

Current Exhibition: The Art of Mourning. June 28 – December 4, 2014

Why the modern bathroom is a wasteful, unhealthy design

Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888 
Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library
Title: Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888. Political Party: Democratic. Election Year: 1888
There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888 

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library

Title: Cleveland-Thurman Portrait Paper Balloon Lantern, ca. 1888. Political Party: Democratic. Election Year: 1888

There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

backstoryradio:

It’s a walk-off, people.




Host Ed Ayers talks with author Matthew Algeo about the most popular spectator sport of the 1870s – competitive pedestrianism – and the U.S. vs. U.K. walk-off that had Americans on the edge of their seats.

For more on the guests and stories featured in this episode, and for an array of resources exploring American competing in sports on the world stage, check out BackStory’s website: http://backstoryradio.org/shows/u-s-vs-them-2/

"Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay on the moon to rest in peace.

These brave men, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, know that there is no hope for their recovery. But they also know that there is hope for mankind in their sacrifice.

These two men are laying down their lives in mankind’s most noble goal: the search for truth and understanding.

They will be mourned by their families and friends; they will be mourned by their nation; they will be mourned by the people of the world; they will be mourned by a Mother Earth that dared send two of her sons into the unknown.”

—   IN THE EVENT OF A MOON DISASTER, a speech written for President Nixon before the Apollo 11 mission. Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins all returned safely to Earth and the speech was never delivered. (via backstoryradio)